IHRC launches Human Rights Guide for the Civil and Public Service

www.ihrc.ie/training

 

Press Release
29 September 2010

Delivering Human Rights based Public Policy and Services
IHRC launches Human Rights Guide for the Civil and Public Service

The Irish Human Rights Commission (IHRC) today published a Human Rights Guide for the Civil and Public Service to support the Civil and Public Service in developing human rights based legislation, policy and service delivery. The Guide is being launched by Mary White T.D., Minister of State for Equality, Integration & Human Rights and Dermot McCarthy, Secretary General of the Department of the Taoiseach.

Dr Maurice Manning, President of the IHRC said "Human rights are agreed standards to ensure that every person is treated with dignity and respect. The State is the primary defender of human rights and must be transparent in and accountable for its actions. The Civil and Public Service plays a key role in ensuring that human rights are promoted and protected in practice. To help meet these commitments, we have produced, with philanthropic support, this Human Rights Guide for the Civil and Public Service as part of a wider Human Rights Training Programme for the sector."

Minister of State Mary White T.D, launching the Guide said "This publication is another example of the important work the Irish Human Rights Commission is undertaking to promote and protect human rights in our country. The Guide states that the primary responsibility for upholding human rights is with Government, through its Civil and Public Service, by creating conditions for rights to be effective. This publication will play a part in creating those conditions."

In also launching the Guide, Dermot McCarthy, Secretary General of the Department of the Taoiseach stated: "As we continue to improve and reform Ireland’s public service to meet the needs and expectations of the Government and the people of Ireland, the information on human rights included in the Human Rights Guide for the Civil and Public Service tailored to meet the needs of the Civil and Public Service will help to support this work."

The Guide is complemented by further information and training opportunities.

Éamonn Mac Aodha, Chief Executive of the IHRC said "The Human Rights Guide for the Civil and Public Service is a reference tool on what human rights are and how they can be applied in practice. The Guide will be supported by an innovative e-learning platform accessed on our website (www.ihrc.ie/training). We will also offer a range of tailored training courses to the Civil and Public Service. These courses are being offered free of charge, and we believe will help to equip Civil and Public servants with the skills and know-how to incorporate human rights into every-day work."

Dr Manning further added "the publication of this Guide is very timely. The United Nations has made civil servants, law enforcement officials and the military the focus for human rights training over the coming five years (2010-2014). It has called on Member States to adopt and implement comprehensive human rights training policies with these groups of civil and public servants. I believe the IHRC’s initiative will assist Ireland to become a leader in this regard. The Guide’s publication is also timely in light of the review of Ireland’s human rights record under the United Nations Universal Periodic Review, which will take place in 2011 and in which the IHRC will play an active role."

 

ENDS/

 

Spokespersons are available for comment.

For further information please contact:
Fiona Murphy, IHRC
Tel: 01 8589601

Notes to Editor

The IHRC’s Human Rights Education and Training Project was set-up in March 2010 with philanthropic support as a pilot project to support the Civil and Public Service. The first phase of the project will run until July 2011 with a view to expanding the project out further in the years following. The Project aims to work in partnership with the Civil and Public Service and tailor human right training to the specific needs of particular Departments and units within it. The Human Rights Guide launched today is available free to the Civil and Public Service and is complimented both by an e-learning platform accessed through www.ihrc.ie/training and face-to-face training delivery developed on request.

See the Human Rights Education and Training project website: www.ihrc.ie/training

UN Human Rights Council Resolution on Human Rights Education
The UN Human Rights Council has made civil servants, law enforcement officials and the military the focus for human rights training over the coming five years (2010-2014) and has called on Member States to adopt and implement a comprehensive human rights training policy with these groups of civil and public servants.

http://www2.ohchr.org/english/issues/education/training/secondphase.htm

 

Universal Periodic Review

  • What is the UPR?

The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a unique process which involves a review of the human rights records of all 192 UN Member States once every four years. The UPR is a State-driven process, under the auspices of the Human Rights Council, which provides the opportunity for each State to declare what actions they have taken to improve the human rights situations in their countries and to fulfil their human rights obligations. As one of the main features of the Council, the UPR is designed to ensure equal treatment for every country when their human rights situations are assessed.

  • Why it is important?

The UPR Process is unique in that it is a peer-review of the human rights record of a State, by other States. The Government has to provide a report to the Human Rights Council, which, along with the Reports of independent stakeholders, will be used to examine Ireland on its human rights record. A series of recommendations will then be made to Ireland, which the Government will have to indicate its agreement with or rejection of before its peers.

  • What difference will it make?

The Review aims to improve the situation of human rights in Member States, and to ensure fulfilment of the State’s human rights obligations and commitments.

  • What is the significance of the IHRC’s role as a National Human Rights Institution

National Human Rights Institutions (NHRI) are independent statutory bodies established on the basis of the UN ‘Paris Principles’ to monitor States’ compliance with their international human rights commitments. One of the key roles of NHRIs is to engage with the UN when their State’s human rights record is under scrutiny. Their role is to provide independent, considered and balanced reports on the human rights challenges and developments in their country. The engagement of NHRIs in the UPR process is considered as key to its success as a rigorous process. There is considerable weight given to the report of the NHRI which will be compiled as part of a ‘stakeholders’ report and provided to all Member States during their consideration of the State’s record. The NHRI also has the opportunity to hold side events and meetings during the hearing of the State Report and to meet with the actors involved.

For more information see:

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/UPR/Pages/BasicFacts.aspx

 

 

  • Facebook Share Icon
  • Twitter Share Icon