The Irish Human and Equality Commission Retains “A” Status UN Accreditation - IHREC - Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission

The Irish Human and Equality Commission Retains “A” Status UN Accreditation

Highest level “A” status confers speaking rights at the UN Human Rights Council

“A” status members hold voting and speaking rights at human rights treaty bodies and other UN organs

The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission has been awarded the highest level of UN accreditation possible for National Human Rights Institutions.

The Global Alliance of National Human Rights Institutions (GANHRI) confirmed that following a detailed review of the Commission’s work, achievements, institutional independence and processes, it is to re-accredit the Commission, as an “A” status National Human Rights Institution.

This continued recognition underlines the Commission’s domestic and international standing and institutional independence, with the GANHRI Sub-Committee on Accreditation commending “the efforts of the IHREC to promote and protect human rights in the Republic of Ireland and encouraging the institution to continue these efforts.”

Only those awarded an “A” status are fully compliant with the Paris Principles and, as a result, are accorded voting, speaking and seating rights at human rights treaty bodies or other UN organs.

The Commission has been confirmed through this review process to be in full compliance with the UN Paris Principles.

Sinéad Gibney Chief Commissioner of the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commissioner stated:

“This accreditation re-affirms the status of the Commission as an independent body which uses our mandate, legal powers and voice to protect and promote human rights and equality in Ireland, and build a culture of respect for human rights, equality and intercultural understanding in the State.

“Accreditation also sustains the Commission’s role amongst the international network of human rights international bodies working on promoting and protecting rights globally.”

Ends

For further information, please contact:

Brian Dawson, IHREC Communications Manager
01 8589601 / 087 0697095
bdawson@ihrec.ie

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Notes to Editors

The Accreditation of NHRIs

National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) are periodically accredited before the Sub-Committee on Accreditation (SCA) of the Global Alliance of NHRIs (GANHRI). They are evaluated with reference to the UN Paris Principles, which are the international standards for NHRIs to promote and protect human rights effectively and in an independent manner.

The Paris Principles, established in 1993 through a resolution of the United Nations General Assembly set out the main criteria that NHRIs are required to meet:

  • Establishment under primary law or the Constitution
  • A broad mandate to promote and protect human rights
  • Formal and functional independence
  • Pluralism, representing all aspects of society
  • Adequate resources and financial autonomy
  • Freedom to address any human rights issue arising
  • Annual reporting on the national human rights situation
  • Cooperation with national and international actors, including civil
    society

‘A’ status accreditation means that the NHRI has demonstrated full compliance with the Paris Principles. ‘A’ status NHRIs have specific participation rights in UN processes and mechanisms. For example, they have speaking rights immediately following their respective State in the Human Rights Council, for the Universal Periodic Review, and before UN Treaty Bodies. In Europe, ‘A’ status NHRIs are valued interlocutors for regional mechanisms, such as the OSCE, the Council of Europe and European Union institutions and agencies.

The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission

The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission is an independent public body, appointed by the President and directly accountable to the Oireachtas. The Commission has a statutory remit set out under the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission Act (2014) to protect and promote human rights and equality in Ireland, and build a culture of respect for human rights, equality and intercultural understanding in the State. As part of its statutory remit, the Commission has a specific function to work towards the elimination of discrimination.

 

 

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