Strong Public Support for Human Rights and Equality Protections Shows New National Survey

Survey Results Mark International Human Rights Day & 70th Anniversary of Universal Declaration

People in Ireland overwhelmingly (84%) believe that stronger protections for human rights and equality makes the country a better place to live, with 86% agreeing that they care deeply about making Ireland a fairer place to live, according to a new national poll published today by the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission (‘the Commission’).

The Amárach Research poll findings from a survey of over 1200 people is published today to mark December 10th as International Human Rights Day and 2018 as the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR).

The poll results also show that:

  • More to do on human rights and equality – 85% of people believe we still have significant work to do in Ireland to protect human rights and equality – this figure is up 6% from a similar poll carried out in 2015.
  • Housing – 82% of people generally, and 89% of 18-24-year olds believe that housing should be considered as a human right. 63% of people generally, and 78% of 18-24-year olds believe that a right to housing should be entered into Ireland’s Constitution.
  • Minority rights – People consider that Members of the Traveller Community are most likely to have their human rights infringed or to experience discrimination in Ireland, with 29% of people identifying Travellers as the most at risk group.
  • Disabilities – People ranked job hunting (74%) as the area when people with disabilities are most likely to encounter discrimination, over accessing public transport (66%) or in work (59%).
  • Equality of opportunity – Opinion is sharply divided on a person’s ability to achieve their potential in our society with 36% believing that potential is limited by prejudice, discrimination or neglect compared to 37% who believe that it is not.
  • International leadership – Just under a quarter of people (23%) feel that Ireland is an international leader when it comes to human rights and equality.

As Ireland’s national human rights and equality body, the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission carried out this survey as part of its mandate to protect and promote human rights and equality in Ireland.

To mark the 70th anniversary of the UDHR the Commission has also circulated posters to all schools across Ireland featuring illustrations of all 30 articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Emily Logan, Chief Commissioner of the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission commented:

“People across Ireland care deeply about making Ireland a fairer place to live and in strengthening protections for human rights and equality,  but are equally clear that there’s still much more work to do in this area.

“People are increasingly looking at issues such as housing through a prism of human rights, and in particular young people under 25 are looking at housing and accommodation as an area where a rights-based approach should be taken by the State.”

“At a time where we have seen a worrying trend of countries in Europe and further afield succumb to the incipient rise of populism, unilateralism, racism and an increasingly narrow and inward-looking vision of statehood, sovereignty and national belonging, this survey shows a strength of public support across Ireland for human rights and equality and a determination to make positive progress.”

ENDS

For further information, please contact:

Brian Dawson, IHREC Communications Manager,

01 8589601 / 087 0697095

bdawson@ihrec.ie

Follow us on twitter @_IHREC

 

Editor’s Note:

The Amárach Research poll

A bespoke online survey was carried out by Amárach Research on behalf of the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission (IHREC).

A total sample of 1,200 was achieved with quotas set on gender, age, social class and region to achieve a sample aligned with national population.  Interviewing fieldwork dates were 9th -19th October.

A link to the detail of the survey is available here:

www.ihrec.ie/app/uploads/2018/12/Amarach-Research-Survey-2018.pdf 

Synopsis of some of the findings

Thinking of yourself personally, can you tell me how much you agree or disagree with the following statements?

 

In your opinion, who or what group(s) of people do you think are most likely to have their human rights infringed or to experience discrimination in Ireland?

 

Do you think that Ireland is a leader internationally when it comes to human rights and equality?

 

Do you think that housing should be considered as a basic human right? And Do you think that the right to housing should be entered into the Irish constitution?

 

 

 

The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission,

The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission is an independent public body, appointed by the President and directly accountable to the Oireachtas. The Commission has a statutory remit set out under the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission Act (2014) to protect and promote human rights and equality in Ireland, and build a culture of respect for human rights, equality and intercultural understanding in the State. As part of its statutory remit, the Commission has a specific function to work towards the elimination of discrimination.

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